Thoughts_HeroImage.jpg

Perspectives

Our thoughts on new trends, ideas, technologies as well as updates on ongoing projects, press, exhibitions and events.

Perspectives

Our thoughts on new trends, ideas, technologies plus updates on projects, press, events & exhibitions.

Supermodel Cheekbones

Traditional craftsmanship is on the receiving end of renewed interest in artisanal techniques and local heritage as part of the authenticity megatrend. These projects explore and elevate the art of glass-cutting in a contemporary context.

Czech designers Jan Plecháč and Henry Wielgus have combined tradition with technology in their latest collection for lighting manufacturer Lasvit. Locally hand-blown and hand-cut using Czech glass-cutting processes, the polygonal lights were designed with 3-D modelling software. They also used an updated pastel colour palette to replace the conventional amber shades associated with traditional glass-blowing.

Polygonal lights by Plecháč and Wielgus, images by Martin Chum.

Polygonal lights by Plecháč and Wielgus, images by Martin Chum.

Following the creation of her OP-jects range, Bilge Nur Saltik has designed a collection of kaleidoscopic vases that optically transform a single flower into a bouquet. The vessels are inverted so that blooms are placed on a plate within each glass form, creating a magnifying effect. Saltik’s vases are available in blue or green and have been hand-blown and hand-cut in Istanbul.

OP-vases by Bilge Nur Saltik

OP-vases by Bilge Nur Saltik

Graham Muir is a Scottish artist who works with glass while it is still hot to generate shapes that are delicate and multi-faceted. His Waves series began with an attempt to capture a wave at the point of crashing down, a comment on the simultaneous beauty and destructive power of nature. This eventually evolved into purely form-focused pieces, resulting in organic sculptural elements that are technically challenging but gracefully executed.

Waves by Graham Muir

Waves by Graham Muir